German Air Traffic Control During The Cold War: The Story of Rhein Control - The Operation of ATC in Southgermany's Upper Airspace 1957-1977

May 25, 2019

This book contains a historical facts report and commentary on the development of the German Air Traffic Control Centre RHEIN CONTROL as formerly operated by the United States Air Force in Europe (USAFE) and the former German Federal Administration for Air Navigation Services (BFS), assisted by the German Air Force (GAF) at Birkenfeld-Nahe and Frankfurt/Main in Germany. RHEIN CONTROL was and still is an upper airspace air traffic control (ATC) centre, formerly responsible for South Germany only, but now also covering all of former East Germany (Berlin UIR).

This report is written by a former air traffic controller and air traffic control expert, who meanwhile actively spent 50 years in the ATC profession worldwide, and has had first served 25 years with the German Federal Administration for Air Navigation Services (Bundesanstalt für Flugsicherung) in upper airspace area control operations, ATC planning and experimentation.

German Air Traffic Control During The Cold War
Author: Fischer, Frank W.
ISBN-13: 978-1536994391
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The Development of Air Navigation in West Germany after 1945: The first ten years - when nobody knew Air Traffic Control (ATC) existed

May 24, 2019

This documentation about the development of air navigation in West Germany after 1945 explains the continuation in the further development of the establishment of military tactical air navigation services units beginning under the military governments of the victorious powers and the succeeding allied occupation forces in Germany. This transportation service of the first decade after the end of the war constitutes the cradle of modern european air traffic control (ATC) as the major part of the overall air navigation services system.

It closes with the partial reconstitution of air sovereignty in West Germany (FRG) in 1955 and the end of the supervision on the re-established german federal air navigation system administration (BFS) by the Allied Civil Aviation Board - CAB of HICOM by mid 1956. This book is available in two print versions: On the one hand, a documentation in colour printing is available, which is primarily aimed at the specialist public. On the other hand, there is a printing variant with the same content, which has been produced in grayscale.

The Development of Air Navigation in West Germany after 1945
Author: Fischer, Frank W.
ISBN-13: 978-1537020426
224 Pages, Colour Print
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The Development of Air Navigation in West Germany after 1945
Author: Fischer, Frank W.
ISBN-13: 978-1537020464
224 Pages, Grayscale Print
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Highways in the Sky - The Story of the Airways and Air Communications System (AACS)

May 18, 2019

Visitors to this internet platform and interested in aviation history certainly wish to learn what this unique book of Louis Shores of 1947 contains. It describes the development of the "Airways & Air Communications Service" (AACS) of the United States since its establishment as a military air navigation service in 1938 until the end of Word War II. The author himself belonged to the AACS for four years. During World War II AACS units served all of the military departments and afterwards in almost all parts of the world with radio navigation as well as telegraphy, teletype and radiotelephony facilities and their operation. After World War II a global network of air navigation facilities remained, operated by 10,000 AACCS technicians, radio operators and air traffic controllers, constituting the basis of the global air navigation system and its air route network as set up within the sope of ICAO between 1944 and 1947.

Many of these former installations still exist at their original locations, alltogether constituting the cradle of the world's present air traffic control system. The report of Louis Shores describes the details of the often dramatic development during World War II. One may only think of the movies on wartime operations in the Pacific. This description is not a technical report, but the story of human achievements performed under the most detrimental conditions. Still today, it allows us to visualize the overall former development in air navigation and leads to remote locations like Poltava in the Soviet Union, Side Slimane in Morocco, Narsarssuak on Greenland, Attu in the Aleutians, Fischafen in New-Guinea, Guadalcanal, Iwo Jima and many more. This story is the description of a pioneering achievement of greatest extent with its consequences up until today. Without these achievements of the AACS World War II could not have been won by the four allies. You can download this documentation, for free. All pages are analyzed via Optical Character Recognition (OCR) that you can easily search the document for names, topics and terms.

Highways in the Sky - The Story of the Airways and Air Communications System (AACS)
Author: Louis Shores
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IATA Air Traffic Services Reference Document

May 17, 2019

The IATA ATS Reference Document was first issued in January 1967. This revised edition - January 1973 - represents an updating and rearrangement of the original content, to reflect changes in the operational requirements for air traffic services which have taken place during the intervening years. This Document sets out to provide guidance on air traffic services requirements, procedures, and practices as seen from the viewpoint of international civil air transport operations. Although much of the content reflects recognized ICAO provisions for ATS, the importance of these services to the operator and the consequences of non-implementation of, or non-adherence to, internationally agreed procedures are also dealt with in more detail than is warranted in the relevant ICAO documents. For this reason the material has proved useful not only to those responsible for the overall planning of air traffic services, but also as a source of information and guidance to those involved in the day-to-day control of air traffic.

In a separate supplement at the back of the Document, IATA guidance is provided for the first time on SST operational requirements for air traffic services. While much of the material contained in the main part of the Document is equally applicable to SST operations, the supplement deals with those aspects which are unique to the SST and is intended to augment the recently published ICAO Guidance on the Planning of Air Traffic Services for SST Aircraft. At this stage, SST operational requirements for air traffic services should be regarded as being of a preliminary nature. They will be confirmed or revised as experience in SST operations is gained. Since this Document is intended for reference purposes it contains, in addition to a comprehensive index, discreet repetition of some of the material throughout the various sections, in order to maintain cohesion and avoid the need for excessive cross-referencing on the part of the reader.

Table of Contents:
01. AERODROMES
02. AIRSPACE ORGANIZATION
03. AIRSPACE RESTRICTIONS
04. ATS INFORMATION
05. ATS FLIGHT PLANS
06. ATS COORDINATION
07. ATC AUTOMATION
08. PRE-DEPARTURE
09. ATC CLEARANCES
10. FLIGHT RULES
11. POSITION REPORTING
12. ATS COMMUNICATIONS
13. CONTROLLER/PILOT COOPERATION
14. ALTIMETER SETTING PROCEDURES
15. CRUISING LEVELS
16. SEPARATION OF AIRCRAFT
17. AIRSPACE UTILIZATION
18. AIRMISSES AND OTHER AIR TRAFFIC INCIDENTS
19. NAVIGATION AND NAVIGATIONAL AIDS
20. RADAR SERVICE
21. OPERATIONAL CONTROL
22. HOLDING PROCEDURES
23. TRAFFIC SEQUENCING
24. DIVERSION AND MISSED APPROACH

IATA Air Traffic Services Reference Document
Publisher: International Air Transport Association
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Chicago O'Hare Airport Air Traffic Control Tower Training Manual

May 16, 2019

This handbook was issued in 1975 by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for the local training of air traffic controllers in the aerodrome control tower (TWR) and the approach control unit (TRACON) for the control of flights at this airport with its seven runways. Already in 1975 the average number of hourly arrivals and departures amounted to 235 movements. Within the control tower cab always two teams worked back to back in order to cope with the volume of the separated traffic flow. The jurisdiction of TWR and TRACON covered the control zone (CTR) and the terminal control area (TMA).

This handbook, issued only for the internal operation, served as a personal information basis for newcomers, who had the nerv to volunteer for work at Chicago TWR or in the TRACON. It contains all then the airport using airlines and their types of airplanes, the CTR and TMA airspace structure with the approach fixes and holding patterns from the north and the south, the configuration of the landing area, traffic flow procdures, the allocation of working positions and their internal duties and procedures.

Chicago O'Hare Airport Air Traffic Control Tower Training Manual
Publisher: Department of Transportation - Federal Aviation Administration
DOWNLOAD [8.12 MB]


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